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Getting To Yes, Clicker Training Book for Horses, by Sharon Foley

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This is a fantastic new book by Sharon Foley, called Getting to Yes: Clicker Training for Improved Horsemanship.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction

PART 1: Before You Begin
Chapter 1: What Is Clicker Training?
Chapter 2: Understanding Horses
Chapter 3: Clicker Training 101

PART 2: Getting Started: Clicker Training Basics
Chapter 4: Playing The Training Game
Chapter 5: A Basic Clicker-Training Plan for Horses
Chapter 6: Safety and Manners

PART 3: Clicker Training and Riding
Chapter 7: Working At Liberty in the Round Pen
Chapter 8: Learning to Follow a Feel
Chapter 9: Basic Leading and Ropework
Chapter 10: Longeing
Chapter 11: Working In-Hand
Chapter 12: Working Under Saddle
Chapter 13: Clicker Training for a Lifetime

Resources
Glossary
Index
About the Author
Photo Credits

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Reviews:

We all know from the list that Sharon has a flair for explaining complicated things in a clear way, and the book gives ample proof of this skill. And unlike the list, here you get pictures to clarify things even more.

As if content wasn't enough, the design is also well planned. Paper that can handle rough conditions, and a handy format - ideal for taking to the stables.

Though I don't know if I'll even get to visit my horse today; I sat down just to leaf through the volume, and when I next looked up, over an hour had passed ... This book will be such an inspiration!

Lottie


Sharon, I received your book yesterday and was so impressed--what an accomplishment, and what a beautiful book it is! It's so well organized, the photographs are gorgeous, the graphics and printing are very professional, and it's full of great information.

Alas, though, I haven't read the whole thing because my better nature prevailed and I loaned it to my friend. She is an experienced horsewoman who was very supportive of my getting Jodie, but has never had a chance to meet Jodie or to see clicker training in action. So this morning we arranged a visit, and she was thrilled with what she saw.

She's in her early 60s too and although she's of the "old school," she is always eager to learn positive ways of interacting and communicating with her animals. She asked lots and lots of questions, very good ones, and I know she'll study your and Alex's materials thoroughly so as to devise an organized plan.

I've also given her the Yahoo information for ClickRyder, so I hope she joins. As an older person with a rambunctious young horse, she's looking for new and safer ways to communicate with him and build trust. At my (ahem) advancing age, it's amazing how often I hear my older but experienced horsewomen friends talk about their dwindling confidence and growing anxiety about getting hurt.

It killed me to lend out your book so soon, Sharon, but the sacrifice was worth it in order to help another new clicker trainer get started on the right foot! Congratulations again.

Kathy


I received my copy of Sharon's book "Getting to Yes" last week and have to add my praise to everyone else's. The book is well structured, clearly written and packed with information. Anyone on this list who enjoys Sharon's posts (and I'd guess that'd be everyone) should get a copy. Congratulations Sharon on such a terrific achievement.

Susan


Normally, I would send this privately, but in the interest of supporting someone who has put so much effort into a product, and who selflessly contributes a great deal to the list that benefits many of us, I want to publicly say,

Hurray! Your book arrived via Amazon on Wednesday! Your book is very readable (important for my attention span impaired by two many years of mediocre academic endeavor), and does a lovely job of integrating the Dorrance concepts and clicker work. Thank you very much. I was sorely tempted to skip ahead past the basic explanation of the initial concepts, explaining clicker work, explaining positive reinforcement, etc. to the exercises and under saddle sections, but I overcame the urge. Different people can explain the same concept and some will say it in just such a way that it really "clicks" for me (forgive the pun). I confess, I own the Dorrance / Desmond book and never made it past the introductory pages and chapters. My fault, not theirs or yours, more to do with timing and where I was at in my horsemanship. I think I will dredge it out.

Sharon, you are probably well past what went down on paper THEN, and have new ideas, new nuances, etc, but it is an excellent work. I plan to hand it on to my "protege" to read as soon as I am done. Now that I am home (and the Buick is not sold, thank goodness, I do love that car), I hope to play with my ponies on your introductory games, in the order you have listed them.

So anyone with $20 to spare, get Sharon's book, "Getting to Yes," read it, refer back to it, glean from it, adapt it to your way of thinking if need be, adapt your way of thinking to it, if that helps. A worthwhile investment, for both theoretical and practical approaches.

Thank you, Sharon, for sharing with us, both in print, and on the list!

Cheers,
Cindy



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